The Pipeline

The Dakar Pipeline Portal, powered by the CSUEA, is the most comprehensive recruitment software solution for professionals in the Video Game, Animation, TV & Film, and 3D Technology & Software Tools industries whether they are Employers searching for Job Seekers or Job Seekers looking to secure the “right” job.

Our primary objectives are to provide Employers with a highly economical, effective tool that streamlines their staffing and recruitment process, and also offer Job Seekers access to job opportunities across multiple creative content industries.

The Dakar Pipeline is not just a job board, but rather a conduit that will facilitate communication and the rapid exchange of information between Employers and Job Seekers. Our mission is to allow people to be as creative in their career and business choices as they are in their work!  That’s why we’ve created an “exchange portal “for our ecosystem to be inclusive of all nascent talent at the earliest stage of development.

HOW DAKAR DELIVERS ON THIS MISSION:

  • 1 – Labor market research and analysis on the supply and demand for talent, to inform college faculty, employers and job-seekers about career paths, changing skills requirements and anticipated job openings.
  • 2 – Industry councils and employer engagement, led by DAKAR Mentorship Network, to convene business leaders and faculty, to strengthen relationships and communication, identify trends in skills and competencies, and build efficient talent development programs.
  • 3 – Developing Challenged-based learning opportunities to enable students to explore careers, apply their education and training, understand employer expectations and contextual mixed learning, receive professional mentoring, and on the job experience.  (e.g. internship and apprenticeship). This also encourages employers to co-invest in the job and career readiness of students. Example, AT&T Sponsored, Arts Careers Technology(Enhanced) On-Ramp (ACTOR) consortium.
  • 4 – Company visits and career videos, to show faculty occupations and work sites in-via virtual field trips, using XR and the best-in-breed Open-Source tools.
  • 5 – DAKAR will launch an Education Portal in partnership with LAEDC to develop a technology platform that will provide access  via the  Pipeline, DPI and third-party site that will creates a regional infrastructure to efficiently connect students, colleges and employers in real time, to share and activate job leads and work-based learning opportunities on a Salesforce community platform.
  • 6 – D& I Open Source Portal, Powered by ASWF to support industry-education collaboration, work-based learning, and map the industry assets using the Academy Of Software Foundation’s  D& I initiatives to drive milestones for next generation trends, and reports.
  • 7 – Student generated, published and distributed workforce news and lifestyle content and curriculum.

DPI

Brownbagtv

Dakar Interactive

I HEART MEDIA PODCAST

Sony Digital Media Production Center

CAREER BOARD

  •  Pipeline Exchange Portal (PEP), which dedicated to educating, recruiting and developing the next generation of industry leaders, innovators, and visionaries of tomorrow. PEP is a digital media/ VR/AR industry specific organization with a 21st Century “Pipeline Development Program” designed to reach and attract the best and brightest talent for careers with some of the world’s leading media, entertainment and communication companies.
  • The source of our success stems from our relationship with the largest entertainment industry organizations such as,
  • AT&T
  • LAEDC
  • DMA,
  • CCW.  

All of our educational programs are infused with this rare look inside the industry’s coveted Inner Circle.

    • PEP will take the first charter group of community college students this fall into an immersive Global Inclusion Workforce Alliance supported by the philanthropy of an A list celebrity who’s dedicated his brand to a University concept that will launch and Academy, a digital content lab and lastly a scholarship program to bundle a technology driven and more culturally diverse team of generation Z and Millnneals  than any other cohort.
    • PEP is dedicated to creating an environment for synergy between higher education institutions, organizations and the entertainment community that opens the doors of opportunity and access for a multi-ethnic talent pool that has traditionally been underrepresented in the media industry. Inclusion, multidisciplinary, character-development are the pillars of this University Concept and will be underpinned by mentorship, scholarship, and apprenticeship.
    • PEP, recruits, empowers and advocates for the next generation of industry leaders in the media, entertainment and communication industry. PEP engages and develops talent starting at the 10th-grade through California Community Colleges level through post-bachelor programs.  PEP is a consultant providing the tools and resources for personal and professional development for leveraging and navigating a career in this highly competitive career market.

    • Those who experience the collaborative strength of PEP will experience the full spectrum of career pathway placement, complete with certifications, and recommendation letter from the industry insiders such as Kevin Hart and most importantly how to excel and become a life long member of the cohort and mentor-to-be for future generations.
    • The Talented Tenth Connector is a development program dedicated to educating, training and recruiting the best and brightest diverse student leaders from our nation’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and other Predominately Minority Institutions (PMIs) for careers in entertainment, media, and technology.Each year EICOP founder and president Stacy Milner and a team of industry professionals kick off the fall with The HBCU College Tour, a series of workshops, seminars and panel discussions held on HBCU campuses across the country aimed at offering students and faculty a rare look at the inner workings of the entertainment industry while equipping students with the tools and resources necessary to succeed in this highly competitive environment.

A2MEND, A TRUSTED SOURCE FOR COMMUNITY COLLEGE TALENT

The two-day 2019 A2MEND Summit has come and gone, and yet for the life of me I can’t get enough, and pray these brothers keep this energy exchange going year around through some social channel.  I hope the memories, moments and young scholars don’t fade away like most LA events tend to do. Dakar Foundation pledges to find a  platform with our partner network that will build a funnel for the next generation of A2MEND scholars to find their road to service and sacrifice.


 

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Late post from day one. Too much power in these words to not share them with somebody. #bettertellsomebody #whoyoube #SupaFacts #A2MEND

A post shared by LBCC A2MEND (@a2mend_of_lbcc) on

A2MEND

Kevin Clark-Los Angeles


A2MEND, where did you come from, I wish I had known you sooner, because so many young men would be so much more capable to compete here in the creative-tech Economy in Los Angeles County, but because I know you now, I’ll shout your praises unapologetically.

 Scholarship recipient, and engineer student at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo on his way to summer Internship at Intel.

Dakar Foundation was invited by Donovan Green, AT&T, to A2MEND’s 11th annual celebration without a lot of  prior publicity and fanfare, yet I witnessed a mix of mentorship, networking, and well over 1,000 attendees fired-up and ready for anything.  I sat a table for lunch with my good friend, Michelle Turner USC Black Alumni,  Richard Benbow, Community Relations, UCLA, and  next to Marryann Reyes Jackmon, California State University, Office of the Chancellor as we witnessed a range of emotions from tears-to-wisdom from this unsung group of administrators, instructors, and students.

We exchanged handshakes and business cards throughout the full-day and took as many pictures and video clips as I could in one-day.  I commend Donovan and AT&T’s support at the Platinum level and witnessed A2MEND’s sincere appreciation and social impact at the Awards & Scholarship Dinner.

So to Donovan, and AMEND, thanks for being one of the most memorable experiences I’ve witnessed in my 50 years of advocacy for under-resourced communities. Dakar has a new friend in A2MEND and an ally in the fight to get our communities cultural equity and inclusion at the highest level.

 Pictured Above, Donovan Green, Amir Johnson,AT&T

Donovan said ” I attended several excellent career skills building and mentor workshops from morning to evening. During the scholarship luncheon several students gave very emotional testimonials on how A2MEND helped them to overcome challenges to qualify for scholarships and transfer to 4-year colleges.

As part of their mission A2MEND gave out 70 scholarships to students to get them to the next level, and AT&T and other sponsors helped to make those scholarships possible.

Below is our capture of the day-to-evening events, in no particular order.








  Instructor Eric Handy, Diablo Valley Community College Presents @ 2018 A2MEND Conference, March 1.



Instructor Nathan A. Jone, Skyline Community College, Oakland Presents @ 2018 A2MEND Conference, March 1

HIGHLIGHTS FROM PAST A2MEND EVENTS

IMMERSIVE MEDIA CAREER EXPLORATION

INTRODUCTION AND CONTEXT

This proposal was developed as part of the educational strategic planning process for the “DAKAR “Immersive Media Career Exploration “ experience that aligns with the overarching goals of the Career Technical Education and the Strong Workforce Deliverables.

NEEDS STATEMENT
There is currently an unprecedented opportunity for Los Angeles Community College District to rethink its approach to providing career pathways and access to the creative economy.  Many of our students are at risk for dropping out of the system because they perceive their education to be a dead end journey marked by failure to be placed in the burgeoning creative-tech economy

Other students, although possessed of skills and motivation, are unprepared to engage in the creative tech workforce or perceive no avenues for their constructive future vision  in Silicon Beach and remain unequipped to take their place as positive, employed contributors to our communities’ well-being.

PROJECTED OUTCOMES DELIVERED TO LAMC

  • Industry partners who are able to provide internships for our students and be matched with existing internship programs such as the Evolve Education Fund
  • Placement of students in internships or jobs that meet the standard set forth by industry partners such as, AT&T Aspire.
  • Plan for providing the 1-on-1 mentorships to produce career ready portfolios, resume and digital footprint for student candidates.

 

  • ADDITIONAL PROJECTED OUTCOMES DELIVERED TO LAMC
    The model is proposed in this document is grounded in evidence-based research that indicates the efficacy of robust career technical education as a powerful strategy for engaging young adults 18-24. Components of this standards-based, high-quality, long-term programming for inner-city youth will include coursework, mentoring, and participation in employment workplace practices.
  • Within this formal educational environment, the model employs media arts integration as an important instructional strategy. Arts integration is an approach to teaching in which students construct and demonstrate understanding through an art form. Students engage in a creative process which connects an art form and another subject area and meets evolving objectives in both. It allows students to access and experience deep learning both in a particular art form and in a parallel content area such as math or science.
  • Arts and science integration provides multiple mechanisms for deepening student engagement in the opportunities that are offered to them to demonstrate academic and socio-emotional growth. Strategic partnerships with digital media companies, community arts providers, and the broader entertainment industry will expose students to an array of engineering, language, and media arts practices.
  • Participating young adults will be provided with ongoing mentoring and coursework pathways that are custom designed to deeply engage each student in the career path of his or her choosing through formal and informal learning environments, nurturing personal interest and making concrete connections to the abundant arts and entertainment career pathways of Los Angeles County.

LONG TERM DELIVERABLES FOR LAMC
Assemble and schedule curriculum-writing teams to:

• Develop comprehensive unit plans that embed the media arts and CTE objectives.

• Into course content for each of the recommended areas.

• Identify mentors and instructors that authentically align with core content.
• Examine and pair CTE and AME Standards within core content.

• Develop authentic project-based learning opportunities that serve as assessments of core content as well as media arts content; create and use standards-based assessment tools.

• As applicable, identify adequate spaces for training, mentorship and job coaching.

• Expand students’ access to media and digital arts learning opportunities, both in class and after school, to drive the school vision, extend curriculum and develop student’s technical skills in digital media.

• Identify and make explicit links between in-school curriculum and after school programming in the context of job shadowing and employment readiness.

• Secure appropriate hardware and software for multimedia digital arts learning. Implementation.

• Integrate Career and Technical Education (CTE) instructors into the ongoing interdisciplinary planning process through common planning time.

• Give students ongoing feedback on the progress of their projects.

• Organize school-wide exhibitions, including performances and displays of digital art, as culminating events for film showings, media projects, and online displays. Expectations.

• All staff, mentors, and instructors are included and meaningful, ongoing contributors.

• Mentors and instructors use core CTE/AME content alongside media arts content, as appropriate, to engage the process of inquiry, investigation, and creation of digital media.

• Mentors and instructors use multimedia resources to deepen students’ understanding of both core content and media arts content; teachers ask students to create multimedia
projects as part of final assessments.

• Students are provided opportunities to connect artistic expression with social-emotional development in which students focus on articulating and achieving their personal, academic and career goals.

• Examples of high-quality student work, including but not limited to live/recorded performance and displays of digital and media art, are present and visible throughout the learning community.

COMMUNITY PARTNERS

• Create an outreach strategy to recruit and select the right partners from a wide range of disciplines and job functions, including the arts and digital media community.

• Develop a procedure to formalize and streamline the induction process for instructional partners.

• Identify and recruit community-based experts, including artists representing multiple disciplines and entertainment industry professionals, to collaboratively plan with teachers and work with students, particularly those who are able to empower students with the skills and knowledge that contribute to college and career readiness.

• Cultivate a network of community-based experts, including those in the arts and entertainment industries, who have worked effectively with youth and are willing to collaborate with a variety of partners.

• Utilize the expertise of all instructional partners in the creation of unit plans and assessment tools.

• Cultivate relationships with community partners who can support effective student career readiness opportunities.

• Explore opportunities for partnership with technical colleges that include courses related to the arts and entertainment industries amongst their program offerings.

• Identify community resources that can support ongoing efforts.

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR INSTRUCTIONAL IMPLEMENATION

1. Interdisciplinary, Project-Based Learning
2. Embedded Instructional Partnerships with Creative Industries Personnel
3. Pathways to Higher Education and Employment through Job Shadowing
4. High-Quality Mentorship and Coaching

FOCUS AREAS FOR THESE MODELS INCLUDE

1) Curriculum and Instruction
2) Community Partners
3) Career Technical Education
4) Training and Professional Development for Mentors and Instructors
5)Curriculum and Instruction

 

• Incorporate virtual field trips, film series, and virtual performances.

• Build and maintain relationships with industry representatives and school staff.

CAREER TECHNICAL EDUCATION

• Identify and select Career and Technical Education modules, including those related to arts and entertainment industries.

• Ensure all CTE coursework aligns with industry certifications.

• Identify and articulate college and career pathways, including those in the arts and entertainment industries; offer coursework that supports these pathways.

• Explore opportunities for partnership with technical schools, community colleges and universities offering programs that lead to job placement in the arts and entertainment
industries, as well as other economic sectors.

• Coordinate with probation to provide graduate students with access to arts learning opportunities.

• Cultivate relationships with community partners to build effective internship, mentorship and job training pipelines for students the following release.

IMPLEMENTATION

• Provide targeted college counseling for students.

• Coordinate out-of-school programming, including arts learning opportunities, which align with 4-year college and career pathways.

EXPECTATIONS

• Standards for Career Ready Practice (CRP) are continuously reinforced.

• Real world, relevant civic learning projects are well-designed and utilized to build college and career skills.

• Training and Professional Development for Mentors and Instructors.

• Provide opportunities for all staff to develop CTE/AME and media arts competence:

• Develop a professional development calendar

Plan and deliver professional development that cultivates and promotes systemic,
sustainable arts integration practice.

Explore opportunities for staff to deepen arts integration knowledge, skills, and practices in team cross training.

Utilize the expertise of community partners, including those from the arts and entertainment industries, in both the design and delivery of professional development

Include opportunities for practitioners to be supported through direct observation and one-on-one coaching.

Create professional development/training for all incoming staff that includes, but is not limited to, high-quality media arts integration practices.

Develop effective strategies for data collection and analysis to monitor program effectiveness and inform ongoing program modifications. Provide all staff with professional development for implementing these strategies.

IMPLEMENTATION

• Integrate community partners, including those from the arts and entertainment industries, into the interdisciplinary planning process through common planning time.

• Provide ongoing feedback to staff to cull innovation and generate high-quality curriculum and instructional practices, including arts integration.

• Continue to cultivate partnerships with professional artists and community stakeholders, both formally and informally, to support ongoing implementation and promote long-term
sustainability.

• Ensure ongoing professional development for all staff to strengthen personal comfort levels and build expertise in implementing the standards-based models for quality media arts.

• Initiate and maintain ongoing Professional Learning Communities that include all mentors, teachers and industry partners.

ABSTRACT
Purpose:
Our purpose is to provide all K-12 students in Los Angeles County with access to high quality, ongoing, and long-term mentoring, coursework, career pathways through business, government agencies and community partners that promote inspired learning and positive connections to employment opportunities.

MISSION
To develop, sustain and promote a community of practice dedicated to creating world-class workforce services to grow individual, business and community support for engaging youth in the creative economy.

• VALUES
• EQUITY
• ACCESS
• TRANSPARENCY
• ACCOUNTABILITY
• EXCELLENCE
• PARTNERSHIP

METHODOLOGY
The initiative will identify and engage community stakeholders who are dedicated to creating a sustainable set of resources for empowering school district staff, classroom teachers and guidance counselors.

GOALS
Long Terms:
• Build to scale with services provided across Los Angeles County
• Partner with higher education to provide clearly articulated course offerings.
• Partner w/business to construct & update clearly articulated course offerings.
• Support counselors w/ externships to help students discover tech-arts career pathways.
• Connect creative workforce industries with secondary-feeder education plans.

SHORT TERM
• Make jobs visible and motivate students
• Develop standards-based, high-quality instruction with rigorous mentorship components
• Provide tools for students to identify an interest in the media arts.
• Develop pathways and resources for career readiness in media arts
• Build a community of practice among counselors, administrators, and teachers.

STRATEGIES
• Provide training on opportunities in the media arts to middle and high school students
• Identify and cultivate industry partners through DAKAR’s corporate partners
• Build parental awareness of creative industries and the value of media arts learning
• Catalog existing CTE coursework that is arts-centered and document success stories

ACADEMIC STANDARDS
California Department of Education
Career Technical Education Standards

GUIDING PRINCIPLE COLLABORATION
CTE partners with business, industry, labor, postsecondary education, and the community to provide classroom and work-based learning opportunities that prepare all students for success.’

APPLICATIONS OF CTE FOUNDATION STANDARDS
Technology Students know how to use contemporary and emerging technological resources in diverse and changing personal, community, and workplace environments. Understand the use of technological resources to gain access to, manipulate, and produce information, products, and services.

California Department of Education, California Career Technical Education Model Curriculum Standards, Arts, Media, and Entertainment.

PRODUCTION AND MANAGERIAL ARTS PATHWAY
Sample occupations associated with this pathway. Producers/Directors for Television and Motion Pictures.

Understand the technical support functions and artistic competencies in film, video, and live production. Analyze the production sequence involved in creating a media based or live
performance production.

Produce a production flow chart for a live theatrical or media-based production.

Identify the responsibilities and activities associated with the preproduction, production, and
post-production of a creative project.

ACADEMICS

Analyze and apply appropriate academic standards required for successful industry sector pathway completion leading to postsecondary education and employment.

CAREER PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT

Integrate multiple sources of career information from diverse formats to make informed career decisions, and manage personal career plans. Explore how information and communication technologies are used in career planning and decision making.

TECHNOLOGY
Use existing and emerging technology to produce products and service as required in the Arts, Media, and Entertainment sector workplace environment.

Employ Web-based communications effectively to explore complex systems and issues.

Assess the value of communication technologies to interact with constituent populations in relation to the information task.

WRITING STANDARDS

Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

Welcome Ken McNeely


Welcome Ken McNeely , Western Regional President of AT&T to Project HeadHunter.    He’ll headline a kickoff program, Friday February 2nd for a 15-week series of workshops, labs, demonstrations, and guest lectures to prepare a cohort of students, faculty and administrators to  submit student candidates for unpaid internship, temporary gigs, and entry into apprenticeships in the various unions and guilds in the tech-creative economy.

SLATE OF PROGRAMMING

How AT&T Can Help?

AT&T DEVELOPMENT LAB

IMMERSIVE MEDIA PLAYBOOK

Diversity Vs. Inclusion

As the old saying goes, ‘diversity is being invited to the dance, inclusion is being asked to dance.’ It’s no longer good enough to be just present, and in many respects, even inclusion is no longer enough – today, it’s more about the feeling of belonging. As soon as you feel you belong, it changes the feeling of being different from a negative to a positive.

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College Readiness in Los Angeles: Research-Driven Change

From The  Los Angeles Education Research Institute (LAERI: @LAEdResearch). Today’s post is the practitioner perspective on Monday’s post: Supporting College Access and Success: Findings from Los Angeles.

This post is part 1 of an interview with Carol Alexander, Director of A-G (College Readiness) at the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD: @LASchools‏), about the research conducted by the Los Angeles Education Research Institute (LAERI) research-practice partnership. Come back tomorrow for part 2!

The research and activities mentioned throughout this post were generously supported by the College Futures Foundation (@CollegeFutures) and the Mayer and Morris Kaplan Family Foundation

This post includes an  interview with Carol Alexander, Director of A-G (College Readiness) at the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD: @LASchools), about the research conducted by the Los Angeles Education Research Institute (LAERI) research-practice partnership.

 

The research and activities mentioned throughout this post were generously supported by the College Futures Foundation (@CollegeFutures) and the Mayer and Morris Kaplan Family Foundation.

 

LAERI: As you know, our report on college readiness supports found, among other things, that counselors had limited time to spend specifically on college counseling and on individualizing their support for students during the college and financial aid application process. Did these or other findings influence your planning or implementation for the College Readiness block grant?

 

Carol Alexander (CA): The findings you shared about the college readiness supports pointed to the need to build greater capacity around college counseling. We wanted to build the capacity of teachers, administrators, and all counselors – not only college counselors. We know that college counseling cannot be the responsibility of just one person, particularly at large high school campuses. Through the grant, we were able to add counselors to our school sites, based on an “equity index,” increasing our supports for our neediest students.

 

The grant is also supporting our “College Counseling Collaborative,” allowing college counselors to develop professional development for teachers, administrators, and other counselors. Also built into our grant is a collaboration with California State University, Los Angeles, through its teacher training program. Teachers, counselors, and administrators can receive 120 hours of face-to-face instruction and 240 hours of assignments about college counseling. [This program provides staff with eight salary points.]

 

The district’s Division of Instruction will also collaborate with the Parent and Community Services branch to develop professional development for parents.

Your findings also greatly influenced the district’s decision to contract with a service provider that can help build student awareness and understanding of postsecondary options and assist counselors in tracking students’ progress through the college application process.

 

Given counselors’ limited time and reported need for technological support to track each student, the district felt that an online tracking tools would give them more time to meet with individual students. Dakar has identified common activities at each grade level that students will complete to develop competency around the application process by the time they enter 12th grade.

 

Also, as part of our ongoing partnership with LAERI, a district team went to Chicago with LAERI researchers to learn more about the research-practice partnership and their projects there. The Univ. Of Chicago Consortium on School Research, with projects including the To and Through Project, and close collaboration partners including the Network for College Success and Chicago Public Schools]. We learned a great deal about how similar issues are being tackled in the Chicago context.

 

We also observed site-based Postsecondary Leadership Teams (PLTs) facilitated by the Network for College Success. We plan to roll out these types of teams next year. These teams will review and monitor data on the college-going culture and climate at their school, the development of student agency, as well as student progression through the college application process.

 

LAERI: Has this research or the discussions that have emerged from the partnership influenced your thinking about research and evaluation?  We know research and evaluation are essential to our instructional initiatives, to inform practice and the effectiveness of program development or action steps. Having a close collaboration with LAERI has helped bring this into focus, and we are grateful to have those ongoing conversations.

 

There is not necessarily a natural internal focus or the budgetary freedom to expend resources toward relevant research and evaluation. Having a research partnership like the one we have with LAERI is a necessary component to helping us reflect on our practice and make improvements.

AT&T PIPELINE CONSTRUCTION THROUGH MENTORSHIP

BUILDING THE AT&T DIGITA TALENT PIPELINE – HOW TO GET INVOLVED GUIDE FOR BUSINESSES SUPPORTING YOUNG DIGITAL MAKING THROUGH EMPLOYEE VOLUNTEERING.

DAKAR is an innovation 501(C) 3 Private Foundation with a mission to help young men and women of color connect with Corporations to bring great ideas to life. We are dedicated to supporting ideas that can help improve our 18-25-year-old underserved lives, with activities ranging from early–stage investment to in–depth research and practical programs.

DAKAR has been in existence since 1992, founded by Kevin and Barbara Clark. Our mission and Minimal Viable Product (MVP) is about building a tech/entertainment partnership with underserved public schools and community colleges in around Southern California, (Silicon Beach). The Tech Partnership is a growing network of employers creating the skills for the digital economy. We work to inspire young people about technology, accelerate the flow of talented people from all backgrounds into technology careers and help companies develop the technology skills they need for the future.

BUILDING THE AT&T DIGITAL TALENT PIPELINE – DESIGN

This creative has been developed with seven years of research and volunteerism in the Compton, Inglewood, and Los Unified School District, Socal Community Colleges, and corporations such as AT&T employees and other like-minded corporate providers of digital making opportunities and corporate goodwill. It sets out the benefits for AT&T employee volunteering to support K-14 digital making. It draws on extensive research on the benefits of employees volunteering using the skills they use at work. It highlights the particular benefits for volunteering in the digital space in ways that bring together the altruistic and strategic intent of corporate volunteering.

This briefing is for AT&T’s Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and HR departments that work in or around technology, or employ staff in tech-related jobs, as they develop their strategies for corporate volunteering. This playbook serves as Dakar’s playbook for to get all sides connected and to provides practical advice on setting up an AT&T Volunteering Pilot.

EMPLOYEE VOLUNTEERING AND DIGITAL MAKING – THE FACTS

  • DAKAR has identified 2.3 Million students K-14, students who can be matched with AT&T digital professionals to meet the growing need for volunteerism and advocacy in the classrooms.
  • The Creative Tech Economy, the Los Angeles County Arts Commission,  the California Film Commission and IATSE provide this playbook with actionable intelligence and framework.
  • Many Tech Entertainment like AT&T believes the digital skills gap has a direct negative impact on their corporation to stay competitive with global creation, distribution and consumption of content.
  • Many employers in the Tech Entertainment sector say the public education the system isn’t meeting the standards and needs of future vis a vie- AT&T employment and Workforce 2025 in the Creative Tech Economy.  Meeting the demand of digital natives in K-14 interest in making things using integrated digital technologies.
  • Many believe digital making is a worthwhile activity, important for careers .enabled by employee volunteers.
  • Face-to-face learning centers, whether they’re fab labs, maker spaces or innovation labs, K-14 inner city students have scarce venues to meet mentors and one another outside of the school classroom.

BUILDING THE AT&T DIGITAL TALENT PIPELINE –NEEDS
The use of digital technologies is almost universal among US Corporations, and the Tech- Entertainment workforce is estimated to grow by 39 per cent by 2030, with 1.4 million digital professionals needed over the next five years. many tech firms believe the digital skills gap has a direct negative impact on their business and almost three-quarters of large tech firms identify skills gaps within their workforce.  However, all industries employ tech staff and the digital skills gap is preventing growth in all sectors. As companies such at AT&T develop their business strategies for succeeding in the digital world, applying information and technology across the business to meet the needs of digitally connected customers, digital skills become even more important. There is a need for people who complement technical skills with business, leadership and communication skills.

FOR EXAMPLE

Digital and information services sector say the education system isn’t meeting the needs of Tech-Entertainment business. This has profound implications for developing existing employees, recruiting new employees, and inspiring the employees of the future.

STUDENTS FILLING THE AT&T TALENT PIPELINE
The good news is that young people are enthusiastic to develop their digital skills.  Direct contact with employers gives them further inspiration-motivating them to develop those skills and consider tech-related careers. These skills are best developed through a practical activity where young people create solutions to real problems (‘digital making’), rather than simply passively consuming digital products.  A large percentage of K-6 students are know nothing other than digital and are interested in digital pedagogy as natives, as well as parents of these K-6 students, think a shift to an IOT Talent Platform is as important in the development of the young scholars and workforce of tomorrow.

Future, it will be these ‘digital makers’ who will make a creative contribution to the economy and an employer’s bottom line.

BUILDING THE AT&T  DIGITAL TALENT PIPELINE –THE CHALLENGE
There is a small but growing network of organizations offering opportunities for younger people to get involved with making things using digital technologies. Two-thirds of those organizations rely on volunteers, but they find it difficult to recruit the volunteers they need. Only by mobilizing expert volunteers from industry (to both inspire and teach) can we meet the rising
demand to develop young people’s skills in ways that motivate them to consider a career in the Creative Tech Economy in Socal.

THE AT&T BENEFITS OF EMPLOYEE- VOLUNTEERING
The business case for employer-supported volunteering is well established, with firms reporting that the practice boosts staff retention rates and morale, enables employees to develop new skill DAKAR generates new recruitment channels and enhances corporate reputation. Recent research indicates that this practice also enables employees to feel more comfortable in and connected to communities in which they work, and to develop empathy for people who are different from them.

BUILDING AT&T PIPELINE VIA – MENTORING IN A DIGITAL AGE
Volunteering is increasingly seen as a cost-effective tool for creating healthy, motivated and engaged employees and delivering learning and development objectives, particularly where companies’ CSR and HR teams work together to integrate it into the core business. Some businesses, such as AT&T, APPLE, CISCO and INTEL feel that volunteering is so important they tie it into performance reviews, with the skills developed through volunteering explicitly mapped onto the company’s competency framework.

BUILDING THE DIGITAL TALENT PIPELINE – THE AT&T BENEFITS

The business benefits of supporting young digital making through employee volunteering are where we’re going with AT&T.  Their Corporate profile enhancement will be enhanced as well as measurable social impact and brand reputation in the realm of consumer engagement: understanding the post-millennial generation of future customers developing and motivating existing talent at different stages of their careers.

Recruiting and Inspiring new and future talent before going into these benefits in more detail, it is worth remembering that volunteering does carry an overhead cost for providers, particularly small organizations. So while it is a cost effective option for companies, it is not free, and some of the best partnerships include mechanisms where companies help cover this cost.

Before going into these benefits in more detail, it is worth remembering that volunteering does carry an overhead cost for providers, particularly small organizations. So while it is a cost effective option for companies, it is not free, and some of the best partnerships include mechanisms where companies help cover this cost.

 

BUILDING THE DIGITAL TALENT PIPELINE – AT&T BUSINESS BENEFITS
The business benefits of supporting young digital making through employee volunteering Corporate profile enhancement: building visibility and brand reputation in the digital world. Raised company profile and reputation with customers and stakeholders, has been shown to have positive effects on brand value and reputation and bringing corporate values to life.

Supporting young people’s digital making sends a powerful message to customers as social good-impact.  The partners and stakeholders for AT&T volunteer/mentorship program will get a bounce in their social profile. It demonstrates that the company ‘walks the walk’; and that it understands how digital technology is reshaping the relationships between companies and customers, and that the skills of digital making help young people become effective customers.

Employee volunteers help communicate the company’s digital vision externally and demonstrate the positive association between the company’s brand, its digital vision and the needs of young people. For example, AT&T Aspire has very much influenced Dakar by AT&T strategic decision to support volunteer activities with a strong alignment with the company’s brand and culture.

Supporting young people’s digital making sends a powerful message to AT&T customers and demonstrates that the company ‘walks the walk’; and that it understands how digital technology is reshaping the relationships between companies and customers, and that the skills of digital making help young people become effective customers. employee volunteers help communicate the company’s digital vision externally and demonstrate the positive association between the company’s brand, its digital vision and the needs of young people. The formation of a pilot the AT&T is developing will provide a use case to support volunteer activities with a strong alignment with the company’s brand and culture.  Dakar believes AT&T customers will understand the workforce narrative to be a post-millennial generation initiative to hire America’s youth, especially Community Colleges.  This will bind AT&T to future customers In the modern digital, where customer-facing processes integrate seamlessly with operational processes, all aspects of the business need to understand customers.

Dakar believes AT&T customers will understand the workforce narrative to be a post-millennial generation initiative to hire America’s youth, especially from within 18-25-Community Colleges.  This will bind AT&T to future customers In the modern digital world, where customer-facing processes that will integrate seamlessly with changing technologies and new consumer experiences.

As the overall age profile of the workforce increases, the gap between companies and their future customers (the post-millennial generation born after the creation of the World Wide Web) risks widening. Supporting young people’s digital making helps develop a deep understanding of the business of the values, aspirations, and behaviors of these future customers in a way that impacts on employees’ day-to-day work.

DEVELOPING AND MOTIVATING EXISTING TALENT AT DIFFERENT STAGES IN THEIR  DEVELOPMENT

Volunteering can increase productivity and reduce staff turnover1 as a result of increased employee engagement and improved morale, and even improve physical and emotional health for employees.  For new staff, digital volunteering could offer a cost effective and low-risk way of providing the skills they will need to progress their careers, especially when compared with the cost of formal training programs. By working with young people to inspire them and develop their digital skills, they develop self-awareness, leadership, mentoring and team-working skills, and their ability to manage competing demands.

It also offers a powerful mechanism for engaging new employees in the company’s digital vision. For established employees, particularly technical staff whose roles are changing as technology becomes mainstream in the digital business, digital volunteering can support career transitions. Volunteers develop the communication and mentoring skills needed to work alongside non-technical staff.

They develop their creativity and adaptability by participating in activities using their existing technical expertise which takes them out of their comfort zone. It encourages reflection on one’s own career or life experiences. It can increase commitment to the company because it demonstrates the employer’s commitment.

For employees towards the end of their career, it offers a powerful mechanism for ensuring they remain engaged in the company’s digital vision and mission, feeling that they are inspiring the next generation. Where the company has entered into a strategic relationship with a provider this provides opportunities for internal networking and the shared reflection on experiences necessary to secure skill development–well-established staff can mentor new staff, increasing internal engagement and teamwork.

RECRUITING NEW TALENT
The competition to attract new talent is fierce. Socially aware, digitally literate Millennials bring with them a blend of technical and social skills. They seek greater fulfillment from work, are led by their values and look for an immediate connection between their actions and their impact.Corporate volunteering programs in general appeal to these potential recruits. Programs that support young people’s digital making identify the company as one that recognizes the link between digital technology and social good, forming part of a strategy to become an ‘employer of choice’ for millennial and Generation Z

Corporate volunteering programs in general appeal to these potential recruits. Programs that support young people’s digital making identify the company as one that recognizes the link between digital technology and social good, forming part of a strategy to become an ‘employer of choice’ for millennial and Generation Z

Inspiring Future Talent The current digital talent pipeline is insufficient to meet most employers’ future needs.By supporting young people’s digital making, and demonstrating the careers that digital skills can lead to, companies can help grow the talent pool they will need for the future. Young people are inspired by role models, especially when they are able to engage directly with those role models in practical activity related to their interests and the volunteers’ work. Through digital making supported by credible volunteers, students develop their digital skills and the motivation to use those skills to participate in the world,

HOW TO GET INVOLVED’ GUIDE FOR BUSINESSES SUPPORTING YOUNG DIGITAL MAKING THROUGH EMPLOYEE VOLUNTEERING WHY NOW?

Today we have a unique opportunity to increase the number of people who begin and go on to forge,= lifelong skills in the digital making.  Computing is not now a compulsory part of curriculum K-14 in Socal.

Computing Science aka STEM is undergoing curriculum reform to build the subject of Computer Science into the Science and Technology area of learning in the curriculum and place Digital Competence as one of three core competencies across the curriculum, alongside Literacy and Numeracy. Familiar, loved brands from across the US have reinforced and built on the work being done in schools as part of the Tech For Hire initiative.

High profile campaigns such as the Hour of Code have raised awareness with parents and young people. Organizations like Code.org are on their way to becoming household names. For example, Coder Dojo has over 3,600 active clubs across the US offering digital skills to over 41,000 children, run by over 2,000 adult volunteers (plus teachers). And TEAL is an emerging campaign that is becoming a much talked about platform to integrate the Arts and Science

The digital skills gap is rising up the agenda as more companies move into growth. Now is the time to foster a generation with the skills and confidence to harness technology to participate in a digital workforce, tackle the social and environmental problems of the future, support the US thriving digital economy and foster new means of self-expression and community building. For companies supporting young digital making it can align Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) efforts with investment in a future digital workforce. There are already some inspiring examples of tech businesses working with digital making provider organizations to provide volunteers, funding, space or equipment – such as Hart Beat University.

HOW TO GET INVOLVED’ GUIDE ISN’T THE NEW COMPUTING CURRICULUM ENOUGH? WHY NOT LEAVE IT TO SCHOOLS?
It’s tremendous progress to see computing as part of the STEM initiative, but this isn’t enough to foster a new generation of digital creators. Code.org has called for significantly more support to ensure schools are equipped to teach computing (through more teacher training, teacher support networks to exchange best practice, and providing teachers with better insights into the tech industry). In addition, even when in full-time education, young people only spend 18 per cent of their waking hours in school. That leaves a lot of time for learning outside the formal system. In the same way that we encourage kids to read books, as well as study English; or to play sport as well as take PE lessons; we believe that young people need access to engaging digital making experiences outside, as well as inside, the classroom. Think about the passions in your life when you were growing up. Informal learning is a critical component of an effective education. But only one in 60 young people who are interested in digital making are able to access opportunities to learn outside of school.

That leaves a lot of time for learning outside the formal system. In the same way that we encourage kids to read books, as well as study English; or to play sport as well as take PE lessons; we believe that young people need access to engaging digital making experiences outside, as well as inside, the classroom. Think about the passions in your life when you were growing up. Informal learning is a critical component of an effective education. But only one in 60 young people who are interested in digital making are able to access opportunities to learn outside of school.

HOW TO GET INVOLVED’ GUIDE OPPORTUNITIES AREN’T EVENLY SPREAD – GEOGRAPHICAL AND GENDER GAPS NEED FILLING
The high demand from parents and young people for digital making are consistent across the US – but this is not matched by the provision. With only minimal face-to-face learning places like Hart Beat offered to young people outside of the school classroom, all areas have potential for growth – but Silicon Beach is ground zero.

Also, an action is needed to change the numbers of women working in the tech sector, which currently well below acceptable. More girls need to be made enthusiastic and confident about pursuing a tech career, and role models from industry are a great place to start.

TECH VOLUNTEERS INSPIRING A NEW GENERATION OF DIGITAL CREATORS
Young digital making is powered by volunteers. Two-thirds of the organizations offering digital making activities rely on volunteers. Volunteers from the corporate sector bring with them a set of experiences of how digital technology shapes our world and a passion for the application of technology and their line of work. Adult volunteers can also provide much needed positive
role models – building young people’s aspirations and confidence. However, national digital making organizations find it difficult to recruit the volunteers they need.

For example, Black Girls Codes operates as a para-education platform that has a  waiting list looking for volunteers. Only by mobilizing expert volunteers from industry (as well as enthusiasts, interested amateurs, hobbyists and parents) can we meet the need. This could be volunteers from the typical tech industries, but all industries employ tech people who could be potential volunteers – for example, industries where digital creation is becoming increasingly important, such as design, fashion or music.  This could be volunteers from the typical tech industries, but all industries employ tech people who could be potential volunteers – for example, industries where digital creation is becoming increasingly important, such as design, fashion or music.

For example, CoderDojo operates routinely, yet have many parents and young students on their waiting list for seats in their sessions. They’re constantly looking for volunteers. Only by mobilizing expert volunteers from industry (as well as enthusiasts, interested amateurs, hobbyists and parents) can we meet the need. This could be volunteers from the typical tech industries, but all industries employ tech people who could be potential volunteers – for example, industries where digital creation is becoming increasingly important, such as design, fashion or music.

HOW TO GET INVOLVED’ GUIDE-WHAT KINDS OF VOLUNTEERING OPPORTUNITIES ARE THERE?
There are opportunities for all to get involved, from experienced technical staff who’d be well suited to helping children write their first lines of code through to enthusiastic beginners who can learn alongside and facilitate others’ progress. Volunteers can provide mentorship and careers inspiration, or they can help with skills acquisition. Time committed can be as little as an hour or two and you can even play your part remotely via Skype, or Google Hangouts for example.

Staff in your organizations are well placed to help ensure that young people, inspired perhaps by organizations such as the Brotherhood Crusade are able to take the next steps on their digital skills journey. There are many different programs available locally and nationally – In Dakar’s next post, we’ll have a list of some programs that we hope to model our efforts to as they have demonstrated best practice and have wide geographical coverage.

THE AT&T BUSINESS BENEFITS ANNEX
Yvonne Harmon, AT&T
Donovan Green, AT&T
Marcelino Ford Levine, Intel
Ted Lai, Apple
Thomas Burnett, Cisco
Allison Bernstein, Google
Jay Tucker, USC, UCLA
Gregg Johnson, Los County Art Commission

Daryle Lockhart-Sci Fi Generation
Dan Watanabe, LA HI Tech
Rory Pullens, LAUSD ARTS